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  • Vray Almost Current Learning Resources - Books

    Greetings,

    I have to admit I am quite intimidated in presence of such enlightened Vray Society.

    May I bashfully and diffidently ask you for a tiny piece of advice, some recommendation?

    I am about to make first steps into Vray for 3Ds Max with some serious apprehension and intimidation.
    Particulary seeing the content, knowledge and experience emanate here.

    I am looking for a comprehensive, written in a rather hammer-way printed guidance/book for beginners.
    There are quite a few lovely covered books I have found being offered on web (amazon, etc).
    Alas, I am not able to know their learning value.

    That is why I kindly ask you, gurus for any recommendation.

    Thank you in advance.

  • #2
    Depends on what you want to learn exactly. Why books? Maybe video tutorials are more up to date. Not really sure. I remember buying the Vray bible by Francesco Legrenzi about 7 years ago, but the software has changed a lot and not relevant to todays standards anymore.
    Kind regards,

    Ashley

    ---------------------
    www.vizioen.be

    Comment


    • #3
      I can recommend the tutorials "Mastering VRay" and "Mastering Lighting" by Grant Warwick. Really knowledgable guy and in depth explanations. Worth every penny. I would start with Mastering VRay.

      Keep in mind that while this is a very high quality tutorial, parts of it (especially about scene optimization, sample rates etc) are a bit outdated, but nothing too bad.

      https://masteringcgi.com.au/
      Software:
      Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
      3ds Max 2016 SP4
      V-Ray Adv 3.60.03


      Hardware:
      Intel Core i7-4930K @ 3.40 GHz
      NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 (4096MB RAM)
      64GB RAM


      DxDiag

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you Senior Members for your recommendations.
        Why books? - I thing a well written book is better organised, easier to find any references in Often one has to find a tiny piece of information which could be primordial for any advancement (especially in a case if all is almost new for a simple beginner).

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ARTCH View Post
          Why books? - I thing a well written book is better organised, easier to find any references in Often one has to find a tiny piece of information which could be primordial for any advancement (especially in a case if all is almost new for a simple beginner).
          Absolutely disagree with you on this. A well done PDF, or a video with annotations, time stamps, etc. is way more efficient and dynamic regarding content updates, usability and scalability. It's just that many people dont use the tools at hand and instead try to reproduce a paperback thing online or in the form of a video which is like trying to drive a car with wooden carriage-wheels.

          Software:
          Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
          3ds Max 2016 SP4
          V-Ray Adv 3.60.03


          Hardware:
          Intel Core i7-4930K @ 3.40 GHz
          NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 (4096MB RAM)
          64GB RAM


          DxDiag

          Comment


          • #6
            I followed Grant Warwick's Vray course too, some videos might be irrelevant, but I have learned A LOT from this guy. How to look at materials and recreate them, how to optimize settings etc. Most of the stuff I knew from Vray was quite wrong or I didn't understand it correctly, Grant taught me a lot in quite a short time. Even how to work with 3dsMAX which I thought I knew more or less. Too bad he's not producing videos regulary anymore. The last few years have been quite slow. But the Vray course is quite complete for getting a good basis to start from.
            Kind regards,

            Ashley

            ---------------------
            www.vizioen.be

            Comment


            • #7
              I do thank you for your precious opinion.
              I really do appreciate your advice and helpfulness as Seniors and axperts having huge experience in the domain.

              Art48, I have never (yet) thought of annotations video courses.

              Comment


              • #8
                V-Ray has come a long way and I am not sure how much you need to know anymore. I mean, I haven't touched a setting, for the most part in a year. I spent that last few months learning my new DSL camera, with dozens of buttons, but my photography didn't get better. Composition, lights, and shadow are what makes my photos better. Now, I can shot in manual mode, but auto does a great job by itself. The same thing goes for V-Ray now. I don't know, just my opinion. Basic art theory and architectural photography might be a better avenue to develop your skills.
                Bobby Parker
                www.bobby-parker.com
                e-mail: info@bobby-parker.com
                phone: 2188206812

                My current hardware setup: Dell Precision T7910 36-Core Dual E5-2696 v3 Max 3.8GHz 128GB RAM - EVGA GeForce GTX 1080Ti 11GB

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bobby is generally right, but it really depends on what area you're working in. If you do close-up high-end product shots or VFX you might need more software skills than doing everyday-ArchViz. Absolutely no offense here, it just really depends. Some areas need more technical skills, others need less, but they all need a good eye and "soft-skills" like the ones Bobby mentioned.
                  Software:
                  Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
                  3ds Max 2016 SP4
                  V-Ray Adv 3.60.03


                  Hardware:
                  Intel Core i7-4930K @ 3.40 GHz
                  NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 (4096MB RAM)
                  64GB RAM


                  DxDiag

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Art48 View Post
                    Bobby is generally right, but it really depends on what area you're working in. If you do close-up high-end product shots or VFX you might need more software skills than doing everyday-ArchViz. Absolutely no offense here, it just really depends. Some areas need more technical skills, others need less, but they all need a good eye and "soft-skills" like the ones Bobby mentioned.
                    I am in total agreement. With Grant's work, I didn't appreciate it as much as some because to put that much work into one material is insane and the render times, to render one little shader ball, were astronomical. I guess it all depends on what you are using the software for.
                    Bobby Parker
                    www.bobby-parker.com
                    e-mail: info@bobby-parker.com
                    phone: 2188206812

                    My current hardware setup: Dell Precision T7910 36-Core Dual E5-2696 v3 Max 3.8GHz 128GB RAM - EVGA GeForce GTX 1080Ti 11GB

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yep. In my opinion, you have to know the basics and also the over-the-top stuff and find yourself a middle ground that works for your jobs/area.
                      Software:
                      Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
                      3ds Max 2016 SP4
                      V-Ray Adv 3.60.03


                      Hardware:
                      Intel Core i7-4930K @ 3.40 GHz
                      NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 (4096MB RAM)
                      64GB RAM


                      DxDiag

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I would highly recommend this for start :
                        http://mographplus.com/product/the-u...y-for-3ds-max/
                        You can check some free samples on their Youtube channel
                        Grant course is great but for advanced users .. it is for sure not the best course to start with .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just a follow up on my earlier post. Grant's stuff is very well done and he put a ton of work into his training. For me, it didn't fit my workflow.
                          Bobby Parker
                          www.bobby-parker.com
                          e-mail: info@bobby-parker.com
                          phone: 2188206812

                          My current hardware setup: Dell Precision T7910 36-Core Dual E5-2696 v3 Max 3.8GHz 128GB RAM - EVGA GeForce GTX 1080Ti 11GB

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            ARTCH are you familiar with any other rendering engine? how about 3dsMax? and what sort of stuff do you want to render?

                            Comment

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